Appliances and Electronics PDF Print E-mail

Appliances and Electronics


See Financing Improvements for
Rebate and Tax Incentive Programs
See
Heating for furnaces and hot water heaters
See
Cooling for room air conditioners and central air conditioning

See also Recycling Electronics

 

GENERAL
Newer appliances are far more energy efficient. Upgrading your water heater, furnace, boiler, air conditioners, and refrigerator to more efficient models will make a lot of difference, and eventually pay for themselves.

Look for ENERGY STAR qualified products and appliances for your home. Products that have earned the ENERGY STAR meet strict energy efficiency criteria set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. They use less energy, help prevent air pollution and reduce energy costs in your home. http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=appliances.pr_appliances

Appliances account for about 20% of your household's energy consumption, with refrigerators, clothes washers, and clothes dryers at the top of the consumption list.

When you're shopping for appliances, think of two price tags. The first one covers the purchase price—think of it as a down payment. The second price tag is the cost of operating the appliance during its lifetime. You'll be paying on that second price tag every month with your utility bill for the next 10 to 20 years, depending on the appliance. Refrigerators last an average of 20 years; room air conditioners and dishwashers, about 10 years each; clothes washers, about 14 years.

Appliances account for about 20% of your household's energy consumption, with refrigerators, clothes washers, and clothes dryers at the top of the consumption list.

When you're shopping for appliances, think of two price tags. The first one covers the purchase price—think of it as a down payment. The second price tag is the cost of operating the appliance during its lifetime. You'll be paying on that second price tag every month with your utility bill for the next 10 to 20 years, depending on the appliance. Refrigerators last an average of 20 years; room air conditioners and dishwashers, about 10 years each; clothes washers, about 14 years. http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/appliances.html

EERE Here you can find information to help you reduce these energy costs:

http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/appliances/index.cfm/mytopic=10020

 

REFRIGERATORS AND FREEZERS
The energy efficiency of refrigerators and freezers has improved dramatically over the past three decades. A typical new refrigerator with automatic defrost and a top-mounted freezer uses less than 500 kWh per year, whereas a typical model sold in 1973 used over 1,800 kWh per year. Federal efficiency standards first took effect in 1993, requiring new refrigerators and freezers to be more efficient than ever before. A new set of stricter standards took effect July 1, 2001. As of January 1, 2004, full-size refrigerators that exceed the federal standard by 15% or more (and full-size freezers that exceed it by 10%) qualify for the ENERGY STAR label. Compact refrigerators and freezers must exceed the standard by 20% to qualify for ENERGY STAR. All of the models in our lists meet or exceed the ENERGY STAR levels.

When purchasing a new refrigerator, seriously consider getting rid of your existing refrigerator rather than moving it to the basement or garage. By sending the older unit for recycling, you will reap all the savings from your new high-efficiency refrigerator. Refrigerators under 25 cubic feet should meet the needs of most households. The models over 25 cubic feet use significantly more energy. http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topfridge.htm

1. ENERGY STAR Refrigerators and freezers http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=refrig.pr_refrigerators
2. American Council For An Energy-Efficient Economy’s
Consumer Guide To Home Energy Savings: Condensed Online Version at http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/mostenef.htm. The online version includes information on Refrigerators at http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topfridge.htm.
Buying a new refrigerator
http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/fridge.htm

 

CLOTHES WASHERS
Buying a front-loading washer, saves water and energy. Conventional top-loading washers use a large vertical drum. Most high-efficiency washers utilize a horizontal-axis design; loading from the front, they tumble clothes through a much smaller pool of water. There are also several high-efficiency models that utilize a vertical axis and load from the top .

Horizontal-axis clothes washers save energy because they use less water. Most of the energy needed for clothes washing goes to heating the water. High-efficiency washers use up to 18 gallons less water per load and remove more moisture from the clothes with a high-speed spin cycle. As a result, energy costs can be reduced as much as 50 percent. In addition, manufacturers say high-efficiency machines get clothes cleaner and are gentler to fabrics.
http://www.cee1.org/com/cwsh/howduzit.php3

1. ENERGY STAR Clothes Washers http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=clotheswash.pr_clothes_washers
2. The Rocky Mountain Institute has a Home Resource Efficiency site that includes nine Home Energy Briefs, Number 6 includes clothes washers
http://www.rmi.org/images/other/Energy/E04-16_HEB6CleaningApps.pdf.
3. American Council For An Energy-Efficient Economy’s
Consumer Guide To Home Energy Savings Clothes Washers http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topwash.htm

 

CLOTHES DRYERS
1. The Rocky Mountain Institute has a Home Resource Efficiency site that includes nine Home Energy Briefs, Number 6 includesdryers, http://www.rmi.org/images/other/Energy/E04-16_HEB6CleaningApps.pdf.

 

DISHWASHERS
Most of the energy used by dishwashers is actually the energy required for heating the water they consume. An efficient dishwasher uses less water to do the job. Virtually all dishwashers available today use booster heaters to further heat the water supplied by the water heater to the higher temperatures required for dishwashing, so you can reduce the temperature of your water heater to 120° for additional energy savings.

All of the models listed ( http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topdish.htm) exceed the ENERGY STAR requirements and are at least 45% more efficient than the federal minimum standard. Many of the newer models also use significantly less water—as much as one-half less—than hand washing.

Many of the dishwashers on the market today incorporate soil-sensors to adjust water use depending on how dirty the dishes are in each load washed. A new test procedure has been adopted to better estimate the energy consumption of soil-sensing dishwasher models. As a result, the data presented at this site and on updated EnergyGuide labels allows for more accurate comparisons among models.

Recent studies demonstrate that most new dishwashers do a great job cleaning even the dirtiest dishes without pre-rinsing. So skip the unnecessary step of pre-rinsing—you'll save money along with precious water, energy, and time.

1. ENERGY STAR Dishwashers http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=dishwash.pr_dishwashers
2. The Rocky Mountain Institute has a Home Resource Efficiency site that includes nine Home Energy Briefs, Number 6 includes Dishwashers
http://www.rmi.org/images/other/Energy/E04-16_HEB6CleaningApps.pdf.
3. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy’s
Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings Condensed Online Version at http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/mostenef.htm. The online version includes information on Dishwashers http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topdish.htm

 

DEHUMIDIFIERS
ENERGY STAR Dehumidifiers http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=dehumid.pr_dehumidifiers
A dehumidifier is used to remove excess moisture from the air. Some of the most common indications that you may need a dehumidifier are:

In addition to energy performance, there are many other important operating and convenience features to consider when shopping for dehumidifiers

Other Ways to Reduce Home Humidity http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=dehumid.pr_humidity_dehumidifiers

Reducing sources of moisture can reduce your need for dehumidification. Improving the drainage around the foundation of your home may result in decreased humidity in your basement. Some ways to improve drainage are:

    • Extend downspouts from your gutters away from the foundation of your home
    • Keep gutters and downspouts clear and open
    • Ensure that the soil slopes away from your foundation, to avoid pooling of water around your
      • home
    • Avoid over-watering of foundation plantings

Ensure that clothes dryers are properly vented to the outdoors. If you do not use a clothes dryer, dry your clothes outdoors as opposed to hanging them inside for drying.

Use vent fans (ENERGY STAR qualified ventilation fans use 65% less energy, on average, than standard models) in bathrooms and kitchens to remove humidity at the source.

Repair leaking outdoor faucets . Not only will this help reduce humidity, but it will also save you money on your water bills.

If your home uses central air conditioning, consider installing an A/C vent in the humid space in your home and take advantage of the dehumidifying capabilities of your A/C system. This will also help with air circulation, improving airflow between humid parts of your home and drier parts.

 

CEILING FANS
ENERGY STAR Ceiling Fans http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=ceiling_fans.pr_ceiling_fans
In addition to the
ENERGY STAR label there are a number of other items to consider when purchasing and installing a new ceiling fan.

Ceiling Fan Basics

Ceiling Fan Performance: Components that Count
Ceiling Fan Accessories and Purchasing Choices
Other Helpful Links

 

OVENS AND RANGES
1. The Rocky Mountain Institute has a Home Resource Efficiency site that includes nine Home Energy Briefs,.
Number 8 is on appliances for cooking
http://www.rmi.org/images/other/Energy/E04-8_HEB8KitchenApps.pdf
3. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE)
http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/cooking.htm

Cooktops
Rangehoods and Downdraft Ventilation
Ovens
Energy Saving Tips for Cooking

 

ELECTRONICS
In the average home, 75% of the electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off. Across the US, this equals the annual output of 12 power plants and costs consumers over $1 billion each year.

1. The Rocky Mountain Institute has a Home Resource Efficiency site that includes nine Home Energy Briefs, Number 7 is on Electronics http://www.rmi.org/images/other/Energy/E04-17_HEB7Electronics.pdf.
2. ENERGY STAR- Home Electronics
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductCategory&pcw_code=HEF.
The Site includes:
Cordless Phones
Combination Units
DVD Products
External Power Adapters
Home Audio
Televisions
VCRs

Home electronic products use energy when they're off to power features like clock displays and remote controls. Those that have earned the ENERGY STAR use as much as 50% less energy to perform these functions, while providing the same performance at the same price as less-efficient models. Less energy means you pay less on your energy bill.

Simple actions can make a big difference. The average home has roughly 2 TVs, a VCR, a DVD player and 3 telephones. If these items were replaced with ENERGY STAR models, it would save over 20 billion pounds of greenhouse gas emissions, the equivalent to taking over 1.5 million cars off the road. http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductCategory&pcw_code=HEF.


 

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